Is anyone who has anxiety a good writer?

SilentAndShy

Well-known member
#1
When I was young and anxiety hadn't taken over my life, I really wanted to be a sports journalist, specifically writing on soccer. I completed my education all the way to University with that goal in mind.

However, perhaps during the latter end of my University days I began thinking: "I'm not that good a writer". And since then, writing on my blog I would think I can't imagine any other person reading this and thinking: "Man, this is a good, engaging piece written."

And nine years from finishing University and in a completely different work environment, that hasn't changed. I enjoy reading news articles and column pieces of interest and can really appreciate the style of writers and journalists, however when I try to write on a passion topic, I end up completely with a blank mind with no sense of structure, or idea how to write it. So if I do, it ends up as a wordy, interminable piece that lacks imagination and reads like a boring essay.

Sometimes, I read books and like to write a blog post about it or pick a theme to focus on but it's a struggle to write anything. I even have to write notes of the books into a document or on Twitter to remind me what I read!

Ignoring the fact with my anxiety (related to driving and worrying about how I'd get to places), and general unsociable nature that I have I wouldn't have been a good journalist but still, I should be able to write to a decent standard, right?

Would really be intrigued to know if it's just me or does anyone else completely struggle to organise their thoughts into written word?
 

Miserum

Well-known member
#2
I'd wager that most of the greatest writers throughout history have been either introverted or anxious. Extroverts don't have the inclination to sit down and think to the extent that really good writing requires.

And a lot of good writing stems from the "human condition." A lot of that condition is negative and riddled with anxiety.

Personally, for one to become a good writer, I think one needs to read, A LOT. I know that Stephen King thinks the same thing (he has a book called "On Writing").

It's not just that, but it helps.

I don't struggle to write. Sometimes I struggle with speech though.
 

LoyalXenite

Well-known member
#3
I minor in creative writing so I think Im ok at it. But I am also my harshest critic and several pieces that are probably actually ok get destroyed and never see the light of day. I dont write as much as I used to, now its mostly just for uni, I struggle with motivation and executive dysfunction so I struggle with doing anything.

Theres a bit of a trope that most writers have some form of mental illness though, and frankly its often pretty accurate.
 

theoutsider

Well-known member
#4
I'm a very good creative writer (this is the only thing I'll ever pat myself on the back for). At some point I began to realize my lifetime of studying people and their interactions from afar was another way of storing profiles and traits in my mind. As a result, the characters in my story are more lifelike. I'm better able to describe why they're taking a particular action as well has how their actions affect others. Sometimes associates will ask if I've based a character off of a particular individual that we both know or even if I'm writing about them. I always tell them I never base a character off of any individual in real life. Rather, all my characters are made up of different bits and pieces of personalities I've encountered and studied throughout life.
 

Phoenixx

Well-known member
#5
I'm a good writer for grants and research papers. I'm straightforward and tend to be blunt. I don't think I could be a creative writer, although I did well with creative writing assignments too back when I took a feminist literature class in college as an elective course.
 

MollyBeGood

Well-known member
#6
I'd wager that most of the greatest writers throughout history have been either introverted or anxious. Extroverts don't have the inclination to sit down and think to the extent that really good writing requires.

And a lot of good writing stems from the "human condition." A lot of that condition is negative and riddled with anxiety.

Personally, for one to become a good writer, I think one needs to read, A LOT. I know that Stephen King thinks the same thing (he has a book called "On Writing").

It's not just that, but it helps.

I don't struggle to write. Sometimes I struggle with speech though.
So true! There are actually a few really gifted writers on this forum. I think your point about reading is so good. I love that reading uses a part of the brain that no other activity a person can do does. That makes it even more powerful. I miss being read to, one of my all time favorite childhood memories..
 
#8
I've always considered myself an above average storyteller. The technical side of converting the stories from idea to paper I don't think I excel at as much though. I always find myself grasping for words I can't find or worried I am making some basic grammatical mistake that is just going completely over my head.
 

Sacrament

Well-known member
#9
I've won several literary competitions and contests all over my country (poetry, that is), so I think I'm fairly decent at it. I don't really think about it that much, I just write whatever needs to be written.
 

Kiwong

Well-known member
#12
I am one of the least famous writers in the history of Australian Speculative fiction.

I think my worst anxiety inspired my best writing. My thoughts just kept coming dark and intense pages and pages. Out of the fear came some real nuggets of clarity. I can't really tap into that same sadness and despair, but also beauty. Instead my thoughts have branched into writing dodgy comedy.
 
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