Falling for life wave after wave- a blog

Kiwong

Well-known member
I had a win yesterday.

I went on a field trip to go look for a rare wattle on a remote property. I recorded it there in 1999, but we needed to return to confirm it.

My anxiety thought of a lot of things to worry about before the trip. Such as meeting a landholder who I hadn't met before, would my anxiety be noticeable and annoying; would it rain and the 4WD driving I needed to do be beyond my abilities; would the trip be a waste of time, and we didn't observe the wattle, or back in 1999 I identified it wrong, sending us on a wild goose chase.

The day went well, I handled the 4WD OK, got along well with the other two people with. We found lots of the plant we went looking for. And the view down the Beardy River is maginificent.



Then we all drove out to the Beardy River Gorge in the 4WD.
 

MollyBeGood

Well-known member
That's great, Kiwong. Getting out 4-wheeling and seeing beautiful country is some of the most fun a person can have imo

That's interesting land there, I cannot get the picture to show in a larger window :(
It's looks "snakey", though...are there lots of snakes?
 

Kiwong

Well-known member
Hi Molly, what I enjoy is everytime in the wild it is an adventure, and I always see something new. It is one thing that makes living still worthwhile for me. From this lookout the Beardy River is about 400 metres below.

This property is part of a wilderness, really incredible. The owner was saying he has Lyrebirds and Tiger Quolls ( a carnivorous marsupial). It is quite a dry place with lots of outcropping volcanic rocks with Spinifex and *****ly grass more typical of desert areas. There are snakes, but we didn't see any. Not many swamps or soaks where frogs hang out. which snakes feed on. The good thing was the lack of evidence of feral animals such as pigs and goats. The goats often browse on rare plants, but where the rare wattle was, there was only evidence of Wallaby Scats.

This is now the largest known population of Velvet Wattle.

^ can't post any other photos photobucket won't let me.
 
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MollyBeGood

Well-known member
Hi Molly, what I enjoy is everytime in the wild it is an adventure, and I always see something new. It is one thing that makes living still worthwhile for me. From this lookout the Beardy River is about 400 metres below.

This property is part of a wilderness, really incredible. The owner was saying he has Lyrebirds and Tiger Quolls ( a carnivorous marsupial). It is quite a dry place with lots of outcropping volcanic rocks with Spinifex and *****ly grass more typical of desert areas. There are snakes, but we didn't see any. Not many swamps or soaks where frogs hang out. which snakes feed on. The good thing was the lack of evidence of feral animals such as pigs and goats. The goats often browse on rare plants, but where the rare wattle was, there was only evidence of Wallaby Scats.

This is now the largest known population of Velvet Wattle.

^ can't post any other photos photobucket won't let me.
HEllo : ) Are you still working on your book with all your rare plant species then? Thanks for posting the larger photos btw That country does look very unique! I love wilderness areas they are the most un-touched, here they have no vehicles allowed in them.
I am glad the carnivorous marsupials are not very big on further investigation of them! A kangaroo sized meat-eater might be scarier than a snake(s) lol

I hope you have many more good adventures, Kiwong!
 

Kiwong

Well-known member
Thanks Molly. There are fossils of flesh eating kangaroos. Glad the comtemporary Australian fauna is less scary. My books are moving along slowly, I have about seven hundred plant species photographed.
 

Kiwong

Well-known member
Yesterday was a good day. I went out in the field, the guy with me is really bright personality. It turns out he has anxiety too, and is on medication like me. So we had a good talk in car on the drive to the site. He is different in that he is more gregarious, and has a partner and child. In my life I have rarely friends. I enjoyed his company during the dear.

We did a couple of sites at a lady's bush property, she is a sculptor. Two dogs kept us company during the day, followed us around in the bush. We sat on a log and two dogs joined us while we were filling out site sheets. They almost licked us to death.

The property had interesting billabongs, rainforest and paperbark communities. The day was cooler and less sweaty as autumn arrives.
 
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