Visiting places that give anxiety

SilentAndShy

Well-known member
#1
I no jack all about cars and maintaining a car and having to know what all that entails gives me great anxiety.

This leads to anxiety on visiting a garage to discuss a repair with someone who is more knowledgeable but also at times he can be quite blunt and unapproachable. I take it to this garage as this is most commonly used with family.

I get myself up in a state thinking about it, what to say and do. I try to call up ahead in advance but that doesn't seem to be the preferred method of communication by the mechanic (any tips on how best not to piss off mechanics would be appreciated) and it has meant I've not turned up sometimes when I've said I would.

Customer service is important to me and it seems for these guys, it's about the hard yards to do the job and I feel inferior speaking to them without embarrassing myself even more.

Tips appreciated and your experiences.
 
#3
Can you bring along a family member who is more knowledgeable with cars? Let them take the reigns on it
I agree.

I've always asked my granddad to go with me, SilentAndShy, since he knows way more about cars than I do.

He's getting old, though, so I actually got my brother to do it for me on Friday. My car was a year past its inspection date, that's how bad I was dreading it and how long I put it off. :rolleyes:
 
#5
I'm someone who prefers doing things in person as opposed to over the phone, but with car work I've found most mechanics do appreciate being called ahead of time, especially smaller businesses. With the purpose of the call to make their life easier, e.i. asking when would be best to bring the car in. The answer to that could be not any time in the near future (as they are full up), and going to a different mechanic is OK in those situations.

Now, as to pissing off a mechanic.

I've not turned up sometimes when I've said I would.
I would guess that would do it. It's like reserving a big table at a restaurant and not showing up. They're expecting the money from the business, but instead no one shows up AND they might turn other business away to save the spot.

Now, for most people in the customer service field something like this would roll off their back pretty quickly. I wouldn't worry about it being on the mind of the mechanic next time you bring in your car.

I would try to make a more conscious effort to keep the mechanic in mind though. I don't think there's anything wrong with flat out saying "hey, is it easier if I just drop in with my car, or do you prefer I call ahead and make an appointment?" or "I'm not really a car person, are there particular things I should take note of when I think my car needs to be brought in?" It's ok to ask questions, and be clear when you don't know something. With a blunt person, I imagine it being particularly helpful.
 

SilentAndShy

Well-known member
#6
Can you bring along a family member who is more knowledgeable with cars? Let them take the reigns on it

Ideally, yes. However my school report as a kid said I struggled to ask for help and that has endured. I just fear the roll eyes reaction of family members and friends to say if they can accompany me. Part of me wants to handle it on my own, yet I worry about making an error or getting ripped off.

I'm someone who prefers doing things in person as opposed to over the phone, but with car work I've found most mechanics do appreciate being called ahead of time, especially smaller businesses. With the purpose of the call to make their life easier, e.i. asking when would be best to bring the car in. The answer to that could be not any time in the near future (as they are full up), and going to a different mechanic is OK in those situations.



Now, as to pissing off a mechanic.



I would guess that would do it. It's like reserving a big table at a restaurant and not showing up. They're expecting the money from the business, but instead no one shows up AND they might turn other business away to save the spot.

\\\\\\\\\\\

Now, for most people in the customer service field something like this would roll off their back pretty quickly. I wouldn't worry about it being on the min of the mechanic next time you bring in your car.

I would try to make a more conscious effort to keep the mechanic in mind though. I don't think there's anything wrong with flat out saying "hey, is it easier if I just drop in with my car, or do you prefer I call ahead and make an appointment?" or "I'm not really a car person, are there particular things I should take note of when I think my car needs to be brought in?" It's ok to ask questions, and be clear when you don't know something. With a blunt person, I imagine it being particularly helpful.
I wonder whether mechanics in the UK can’t be bothered with discussing it on the phone and would rather view the problem in person and diagnose. I do agree that I pissed him off at the start and our relationship got off on the wrong foot. I hoped having a mutual person we know of (my brother) may ease things but evidently, not so.

I did go today to see him, it went well. If you disregard me awkwardly parking into his garage bay in full view of him and his colleagues, struggling to open the reception door, then the worst of all blurting out a name that wasn’t his to him. His face didn’t respond with levity. It wasn’t a welcoming vibe – once he’d come to look at my car, he seemed more helpful. He seems more jovial with other people who came after me, but it’s difficult to repair old issues I think.
 

SilentAndShy

Well-known member
#7
Just an update that the next visit was fairly straightforward, he was busy as you would expect but engaged in conversation to discuss the issue i.e. to find the correct part for my car. I tried to keep him informed by calling the next day to say aforementioned part was not suitable but hopefully he doesn't take offence to what could take a while to find the part!
 
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