Are you a NEET? How to get out of this?

Feathers

Well-known member
#1
I started watching Welcome to the NHK and it's fairly depressing..

It shows the story of a cute young Japanese guy who only lives in his room (mostly) and apparently has social phobia too..

In Japan, there are already services that help such young persons.. The anime describes a young girl who tries to help this guy too..
I don't think that anything like that exists where I live.

In Korea, there are camps for computer games addicts and such.

Apparently almost 10% of people may have trouble with finding a meaningful career & lifestyle: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEET
Also see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freeter - some people who just pursue dreams or can't find good jobs and so live low-income lifestyle.. Interesting about the low-cost housing options..

Does anything like that exist where you live? If not, how do people manage to beat this?
 
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Feathers

Well-known member
#3
lol that's a how a friend of mine 'got her act together', her mom made her join the army :)

What's it like in China? Haven't heard about it yet..

If someone is addicted to computer games or such, how can you help that person? (If you're not their Mom?)
 

N04h

Well-known member
#4
Welcome to the NHK is just a story, not real life... although I have heard of counsellors who visit houses of hikikomori.

There's a difference between NEETs and hikkikomori. NEETs are simply young people who don't work or go to school. The Japanese government set up job cafes etc and they don't work.
 

Feathers

Well-known member
#6
Welcome to the NHK is just a story, not real life... although I have heard of counsellors who visit houses of hikikomori.

There's a difference between NEETs and hikkikomori. NEETs are simply young people who don't work or go to school. The Japanese government set up job cafes etc and they don't work.
Yeah I know, I was just wondering if there are any good programs for people who are either or both worldwide? Or ways to get out of the situation by themselves or with help of friends etc?

The Japanese government still seems somewhat confused what to do with everyone, from what I read online...

And in some countries, there may be no programs at all, or for just a few weeks/months and then no support system..
 

Mokkat

Well-known member
#8
You have to consider the kind of society these countries are.

In Japan there is still a code of honor, fx some men who get fired from their jobs go straight to the street to live because their shame makes them unable to face their families. Young people who might not be troubled with SA, AVP, etc. might be so ashamed of being NEETs that they give up, so the government has many cases to help.

South Korea has the longest workhours of any country, and it is normal to work constantly or otherwise occupy yourself with intense activities, until you go to sleep - hence why gaming is such a dominant passtime, why people die from playing WoW or CS for 35hours straight and why there are more than enough cases of "addicted" people for society to do something about it.
 

Feathers

Well-known member
#9
Yeah, I knew some of this, not all - but there are people worldwide with this problem, no?

A lot of youth in my country is unemployed too, what with the economy and in many things not-good-enough education system and other things...

Also in Korea even little kids get taught to go online, I saw a documentary..
South Korea has the longest workhours of any country, and it is normal to work constantly or otherwise occupy yourself with intense activities, until you go to sleep
Didn't know that, interesting. How long hours do they work?
I thought USA had longest hours..? (60, 70 per week?)
 

Mokkat

Well-known member
#10
Didn't know that, interesting. How long hours do they work?
I thought USA had longest hours..? (60, 70 per week?)
I dont remember where I got it from, so here's a quote from Wiki:

By far, workers in South Korea have the longest work hours among OECD countries. The average South Korean works 2,390 hours each year, according to the OECD. This is over 400 hours longer than the next longest-working country and 34% more hours than the average in the United States. A typical workweek in South Korea is 44 hours or longer.

It is just normal for the Koreans to have such long work weeks.

If you work 60-70 hours per week - unless you have your own little firm without employees, and really enjoy it as a lifestyle - you'd stress yourself into insomnia and death by fatigue in your 50s.
 

Feathers

Well-known member
#11
If you work 60-70 hours per week - unless you have your own little firm without employees, and really enjoy it as a lifestyle - you'd stress yourself into insomnia and death by fatigue in your 50s.
Oh gosh, I agree..
I worked 12 hours a day at times and it was totally exhausting..

Probably depends what kind of work it is too..
I think it's no wonder many people get disillusioned with traditional career paths...
So working 60-70 hrs a week sucks, not working too, what else is there?
I think the challenge for everyone will be to come up with new, better ways of functioning... As a society and as individuals.. The extremes don't seem to be healthy..
 
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