Controlling addiction to escapism

#2
I can definitely relate to your post. I have also spent years self medicating (mostly weed and alcohol) therebye anesthetizing myself from the pain of my perceived reality.

I see that the article listed says you need to have a more positive perception. Unfortunately thats where I have great difficulty. I am very skilled at seeing my faults and often cannot recognize any of my strengths. This keeps me from that feeling of hope, which is essential to motivate progress.

I have begun therapy (finally) and there is talk about putting me in a CBT group to help train me on how to think differently. I will begin at the end of Feb. I'll keep you posted on how well it works. Fingers crossed.
 
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gustavofring

Well-known member
#3
I see that the article listed says you need to have a more positive perception. Unfortunately thats where I have great difficulty. I am very skilled at seeing my faults and often cannot recognize any of my strengths. This keeps me from that feeling of hope, which is essential to motivate progress.
Well atleast you recognize your faults. That's not always a bad thing, as long as you don't find faults in irrational things.
Having positive beliefs can sometimes become unrealistic to the point were we are deluding ourselves.
 
#6
Can really relate to the article, especially the 'Cycle of Escapism' part, its so true, I'm in a 'whirlpool of escapism' and it really feels impossible to get out of it.
 
#7
Iv'e been in a whirlpool of escapism all my life,didn't realise how much until I started therapy,couldn't cope with exposure therapy and have been referred for longer therapy,dont think I gony go,i think I prefer good old escapism lol.
 
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