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Old 03-09-2017
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When I was 14, and a freshman in high school, it was the mid-1990s. I also went to a small rural midwesten school. Having said that, this was before all those popular cheerleading movies such as Bring It On. Anyway, it was 1997 and I was 14. I'm in my mid 30s now. Before I tell this story, I will say that there WERE male cheerleaders back then. The concept of male cheerleaders were just simply less common at the time.
Anyway, one day in my early Freshman year, a friend of mine named Stacie tried encouraging me to join the cheerleading squad at our school. Of course being a boy, I was reluctant. I was however super-coordinated and Stacie knew it. She was the only person that saw me do different types of flips and cartwheels. Don't get me wrong, I wasn't very athletic. I was the shy nerdy type. I was surprised I had any friends at all, especially one like Stacie. I also was NOT gay, which makes what happens in my story so unique to my situation. I was open-minded however and had nothing against gay people. In fact, even though we were best friends because our moms were part of the same women's club, I even had a small crush on Stacie. I think she knew it too but she had a boyfriend at the time. Anyway, Stacie tried convincing me that joining cheerleading would not make me gay, and people were ignorant for thinking that.
I was still very nervous but after much coaxing on her behalf and the fact that I was sort of naive, she convinced me. It still seemed weird to me since the whole squad was girls and I was a boy but I went to tryouts. Stacie cheered in junior high, but after tryouts were over, she didn't get in...for junior varsity high school cheerleading. What was very bizarre is that I did! My cheerleading coach said she'd never seen a boy with my type of coordination and chose me and 12 other girls to be cheerleaders. Once again, I was nervous. I didn't know any of them. Stacie was the only friend I had and she didn't get picked so I felt alone.
Here's where the story went downhill for me. A few days after I made the squad, my cheerleading coach pulled me into her office and the principal was there. They both told me, and for all of you reading this post, I am NOT lying...totally serious...that I would be required to wear a girl's cheerleading uniform! Their argument was: I was the only boy and the squad was meant for girls. Before you all say I am a liar, I am fully aware of discrimination laws against this sort of thing, but realize, I was 14. I didn't know about it back then. Not only that, but I doubt those kind of laws were as greatly enforced before male cheerleading became a bigger thing...post "Bring It On" years.
Anyway, I even said to my cheerleading coach, "why did you pick me then if you knew I was a boy?" She said that she thought I was aware of the risk and knew I'd have to dress like a girl. Remember, I didn't know them forcing me was against the law. Certainly I would have sued the school had I known! I also think that they told me that as a way to "scare" me out of cheerleading. I think she and the principal suspected that since I was a guy, I had an ulterior motive...to join cheerleading to be a pervert and look up the girls' skirts. That wasn't the case at all. I wasn't gay but I would never treat a girl that way.
Anyway, after they told me I had to wear a girl's outfit, that was certainly enough of an incentive to get me to quit, so I went home and told my parents about it. Here's where it gets worse! It turns out, my cheerleading coach already called my parents and told them I made the squad and what the requirements were. Even though my Dad said he didn't like the idea of his teenage son parading around in a girl's cheerleading "mini" skirt, he didn't raise me to be a quitter either. I remember in fact those EXACT words coming from his mouth. The word "mini" skirt therefore began to haunt me and occupy my mind after he said that. When I first told my parents, I thought they'd have my side, but instead their argument was: I wrecked the opportunity for some unfortunate girl. If I tried out, the coach thought I was good enough, and some other girl didn't get the chance. They then said that it is unfair for the coach and the other cheerleaders if I quit now. Once I knew they weren't on my side, I was very bitter. My whole world collapsed. I begged them to reconsider but they said no. They said someday I'd thank them for teaching me to be honorable to my word. By the way...to this day, I don't thank them. I just thought I'd throw that in there since I'm in my mid 30s and am now the age they said I would be when I would thank them. It is now "someday" and I don't thank them. Truth be told, they were pretty religious old-fashioned people that had old-fashioned ways of thinking. They didn't condone me wearing a girl's uniform but didn't condone me backing out of my obligation either.
With that, my year of hell as a "girl" cheerleader began. The next day in school, I got my uniform. Right off the bat, as we left the gymnasium with our uniforms in bags tucked under our arms, the girls on the squad were shocked when they saw me with mine. They all thought it was cool and commended me for being brave but I remember them all crowding around me telling me wearing their version of the uniform would be fun and I would look so cute in it. It was awkward and I was embarrassed.
I didn't even pull it out of the bag until later that night when Stacie came over and told me to show her my uniform. I was real nervous but Stacie said she was proud of me for making the squad and begged me to try it on. Knowing I would be required to cheer in front of hundreds of people anyway wearing it, I figured I'd let the humiliation start early. I remember being in my parent's bathroom putting on the uniform with my hands trembling and nervous the whole time. After a moment, I stepped out of the bathroom with it on and saw the expression on Stacie's face for the first time. She gasped and said I looked adorable, but I felt so weird and exposed like I was on display or something. I'll never forget the little purple pleated mini skirt hanging from my waist exposing my legs well above the knees. To this point, being a boy, I had only worn shorts that went to my knees. My short skirt gave quite a view of even my thighs and I was very embarrassed! My top was a sleeveless top with black, purple, and white colors, purple panther paws, and purple lettering reading PANTHERS. She laughed at my hairy legs and said I needed to do something about that.
The following Friday was our first pep rally and the whole school would see me in my uniform for the first time. My Mom got me up early that morning and helped me shave my legs. She even put my hair in a ponytail. I was a boy, but had long hair, by the way. She then put a hair ribbon on me and a little makeup as well. She said when I don't wear my uniform to school, I can be a boy, but I didn't want to embarrass the squad either, so on days I went to school in my uniform, she told me I had to go as a girl to blend in with the other girls on the squad and not look misplaced. She even gave me a bra with mild padding to make it look like I had breasts under my uniform top.
Anyway, I felt weird walking around school in my uniform. By the way, on pep rally days, cheerleaders wore their uniforms the whole school day. I didn't even make it past first period and the boys in my class were all making fun of me! The girls were nice which I was thankful for but the boys were cruel. The bullying was the worse part. While in the hallway, boys were making whistling noises at me and several of them would grab the ends of my skirt and try to pull my skirt up in front of everyone so I had to bat their hands away and keep my hands on my skirt so they couldn't lift it. Several boys humiliated me and said "nice legs!" I'll never forget that. I endured endless amounts of "FAG!" and "*****!" taunts. Sorry to those of you who are gay and reading this. I don't use words like that. I'm just telling you what they said. I was shoved into lockers and boys were constantly calling me "girlie" and "babe" and "cutie pie!" Anyway, fortunately for me, the bullying quit after a few weeks.
This story is getting long, I realize, and I'm sorry about that, so I am going to wrap it up. I spent the rest of the year cheering with the girls as a girl. I can't imagine what the public thought of me at games and stuff and what judges and the audience at cheerleading competitions thought either. I already knew what the school thought. The only good that came from this whole event was the friends I made with the girls on the squad and the enjoyment of the actual cheering itself. When the year was over, however, I did NOT try out for cheerleading the following year even though that disappointed some of the girls on the squad and my coach too. They let me keep my uniform but I was never more grateful when my mom donated it a few years later to a clothing donation. I never saw that little purple mini skirt again. Good riddance! Anyway, that's my story. Thanks for taking time to read it. If you choose to believe it or don't, that's up to you, but it is a TRUE story. I figured being a "social phobia" website and me being quite a bit older now, I'd get this off my chest. But I'll never forget it. It will always be a part of me. Thank you and good night.
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Having read this, I am now wondering if my social phobia has something to do with the homophobic bullying I received when I was roughly the same age.
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Having read this, I am now wondering if my social phobia has something to do with the homophobic bullying I received when I was roughly the same age.
Why? Did you experience something like this as a kid?
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Having read this, I am now wondering if my social phobia has something to do with the homophobic bullying I received when I was roughly the same age
I suspect it has. I got bullied (& also a bit of homophobic bullying, even though i don't think i'm gay, i just look a little bit effeminate).
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I suspect it has. I got bullied (& also a bit of homophobic bullying, even though i don't think i'm gay, i just look a little bit effeminate).
I do too. I kind of looked like a girl when I cheered. My situation was so embarrassing though
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I do too. I kind of looked like a girl when I cheered. My situation was so embarrassing though
Well, my case was perhaps more straightforward. I got bullied for having a crush on another boy. I didn't dress like a girl, and I wouldn't have been allowed to try out to be a cheerleader anyway. That would have been inconceivable.

Going back to you: It seems awfully cruel that you were demanded to wear a female outfit. It seems like you were being punished for wanting to be a cheerleader.
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Well, my case was perhaps more straightforward. I got bullied for having a crush on another boy. I didn't dress like a girl, and I wouldn't have been allowed to try out to be a cheerleader anyway. That would have been inconceivable.

Going back to you: It seems awfully cruel that you were demanded to wear a female outfit. It seems like you were being punished for wanting to be a cheerleader.
Thank you. That's very nice. There's no shame in having a crush on another boy. Are you still gay? It's cool if you are.
As far as wearing the girl's outfit, yeah...it was very embarrassing. Don't get me wrong, the cheerleading outfits were pretty but only when worn by girls. And I wasn't gay! I felt awkward when boys whistled at my legs. The one bad thing about wearing a mini skirt especially as short as what the cheerleaders wear is that skirts don't have legs cut into them like pants and shorts do so I had nothing between my thighs and with it being so short, I therefore ran the risk of people seeing underneath my mini skirt. I constantly had to manage it. I don't know how girls can stand it! Thank God the girls on the squad helped show me ways of managing my mini skirt. Thanks for the nice comments.
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Thank you. That's very nice. There's no shame in having a crush on another boy. Are you still gay? It's cool if you are.
As far as wearing the girl's outfit, yeah...it was very embarrassing. Don't get me wrong, the cheerleading outfits were pretty but only when worn by girls. And I wasn't gay! I felt awkward when boys whistled at my legs. The one bad thing about wearing a mini skirt especially as short as what the cheerleaders wear is that skirts don't have legs cut into them like pants and shorts do so I had nothing between my thighs and with it being so short, I therefore ran the risk of people seeing underneath my mini skirt. I constantly had to manage it. I don't know how girls can stand it! Thank God the girls on the squad helped show me ways of managing my mini skirt. Thanks for the nice comments.
I am living with a man, now that I am 52 years old. I would not have wanted to wear a skirt. No way! I would have felt that I was being punished. I think it's sexy to be male; I never wanted to be female. I'm surprised your parents didn't threaten to sue, instead of taking the side of the school and just making things worse.
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Everyone knows how a male cheerleader is supposed to dress. If they made you dress in some other way, they wanted to make a mockery out of you to teach other boys not to do things usually associated with girls.
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Thank you. I wish that would have been the case! In my dreams! This was me: Even though it really isn't me, it may as well have been. That's how my uniform looked! 😕

https://www.google.com/search?q=purp...mOxn4LEPDj8AM:
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Everyone knows how a male cheerleader is supposed to dress. If they made you dress in some other way, they wanted to make a mockery out of you to teach other boys not to do things usually associated with girls.
Thank you. I wish that would have been the case! In my dreams! This was me: Even though it really isn't me, it may as well have been. That's how my uniform looked! 😕

https://www.google.com/search?q=purp...mOxn4LEPDj8AM:
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Everyone knows how a male cheerleader is supposed to dress. If they made you dress in some other way, they wanted to make a mockery out of you to teach other boys not to do things usually associated with girls.
I just had to grin and bear it...and get used to my little mini skirt
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I just had to grin and bear it...and get used to my little mini skirt
What happened to you was so sadistic ... was this in the Bible belt, by any chance?
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Everyone knows how a male cheerleader is supposed to dress. If they made you dress in some other way, they wanted to make a mockery out of you to teach other boys not to do things usually associated with girls.
In my mind, I imagine you like this. So be it.
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What happened to you was so sadistic ... was this in the Bible belt, by any chance?
No, this was the Midwest. I lived in the Nebraska/Iowa/South Dakota area. The bullying was bad and the thought of people staring at my legs because I was wearing a mini skirt was embarrassing. Cheering in it wasn't so bad! I'm not saying I enjoyed it but remember, it was a year. It got to the point where I accepted and even forgot I had on a girl's mini skirt.
One thing that was embarrassing was an incident that happened in late October around homecoming. At one of our pep rallies, we had the football players dress up as girl cheerleaders. They had hairy legs and beards. We lent them our uniforms but on them, the skirts looked weird. They almost seemed longer! It made me feel awkward because they were boys wearing skirts for a joke as part of the pep rally, however here I was: a boy wearing a seemingly shorter mini skirt looking like a girl...for real!
There were some cheerleading competitions and some games that were ok.
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Your parents really could have -- if they had wanted it -- made a big deal out of this. I could easily imagine this being a newspaper headline, illustrating the narrow-mindedness of the school. Maybe that would have been worse for you though. If there were something I could say to make you feel better, I would.
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benjameson2017: I love your story, but well, what HS did you go to?, or the very least which state, b/c Midwestern states are these:

Kansas
Nebraska
South Dakota
North Dakota
Missouri
Iowa
Minnesota
Wisconsin
Michigan
Illinois
Indiana

& Ohio.

So true you gave us the mascot and the color scheme, but mascots and color schemes change sometimes even if the mascot didnt change then the color scheme might. And well I believe classmates.com has yearbooks of the early 2000s late 90s for sure, but gives me three choices of the yrs of your freshmen yr 96,97 or 98, not sure when the Midwestern stares start school, but southern states start school in august, so I'm a researcher in other words I don't believe stories until I research them personally, by means of travelling to wherever the current coach may be at, especially if they're retired or whatnot, if retired then I'm out of luck. So your coaches name is/was whom? Where did you go to HS at because even if you don't tell me, I'll find out one way or another, why? B/c I wonder if they still do that that's one reason. And I think you could still sue your school for trauma or emotional abuse as well too.
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When I was 14, and a freshman in high school, it was the mid-1990s. I also went to a small rural midwesten school. Having said that, this was before all those popular cheerleading movies such as Bring It On. Anyway, it was 1997 and I was 14. I'm in my mid 30s now. Before I tell this story, I will say that there WERE male cheerleaders back then. The concept of male cheerleaders were just simply less common at the time.
Anyway, one day in my early Freshman year, a friend of mine named Stacie tried encouraging me to join the cheerleading squad at our school. Of course being a boy, I was reluctant. I was however super-coordinated and Stacie knew it. She was the only person that saw me do different types of flips and cartwheels. Don't get me wrong, I wasn't very athletic. I was the shy nerdy type. I was surprised I had any friends at all, especially one like Stacie. I also was NOT gay, which makes what happens in my story so unique to my situation. I was open-minded however and had nothing against gay people. In fact, even though we were best friends because our moms were part of the same women's club, I even had a small crush on Stacie. I think she knew it too but she had a boyfriend at the time. Anyway, Stacie tried convincing me that joining cheerleading would not make me gay, and people were ignorant for thinking that.
I was still very nervous but after much coaxing on her behalf and the fact that I was sort of naive, she convinced me. It still seemed weird to me since the whole squad was girls and I was a boy but I went to tryouts. Stacie cheered in junior high, but after tryouts were over, she didn't get in...for junior varsity high school cheerleading. What was very bizarre is that I did! My cheerleading coach said she'd never seen a boy with my type of coordination and chose me and 12 other girls to be cheerleaders. Once again, I was nervous. I didn't know any of them. Stacie was the only friend I had and she didn't get picked so I felt alone.
Here's where the story went downhill for me. A few days after I made the squad, my cheerleading coach pulled me into her office and the principal was there. They both told me, and for all of you reading this post, I am NOT lying...totally serious...that I would be required to wear a girl's cheerleading uniform! Their argument was: I was the only boy and the squad was meant for girls. Before you all say I am a liar, I am fully aware of discrimination laws against this sort of thing, but realize, I was 14. I didn't know about it back then. Not only that, but I doubt those kind of laws were as greatly enforced before male cheerleading became a bigger thing...post "Bring It On" years.
Anyway, I even said to my cheerleading coach, "why did you pick me then if you knew I was a boy?" She said that she thought I was aware of the risk and knew I'd have to dress like a girl. Remember, I didn't know them forcing me was against the law. Certainly I would have sued the school had I known! I also think that they told me that as a way to "scare" me out of cheerleading. I think she and the principal suspected that since I was a guy, I had an ulterior motive...to join cheerleading to be a pervert and look up the girls' skirts. That wasn't the case at all. I wasn't gay but I would never treat a girl that way.
Anyway, after they told me I had to wear a girl's outfit, that was certainly enough of an incentive to get me to quit, so I went home and told my parents about it. Here's where it gets worse! It turns out, my cheerleading coach already called my parents and told them I made the squad and what the requirements were. Even though my Dad said he didn't like the idea of his teenage son parading around in a girl's cheerleading "mini" skirt, he didn't raise me to be a quitter either. I remember in fact those EXACT words coming from his mouth. The word "mini" skirt therefore began to haunt me and occupy my mind after he said that. When I first told my parents, I thought they'd have my side, but instead their argument was: I wrecked the opportunity for some unfortunate girl. If I tried out, the coach thought I was good enough, and some other girl didn't get the chance. They then said that it is unfair for the coach and the other cheerleaders if I quit now. Once I knew they weren't on my side, I was very bitter. My whole world collapsed. I begged them to reconsider but they said no. They said someday I'd thank them for teaching me to be honorable to my word. By the way...to this day, I don't thank them. I just thought I'd throw that in there since I'm in my mid 30s and am now the age they said I would be when I would thank them. It is now "someday" and I don't thank them. Truth be told, they were pretty religious old-fashioned people that had old-fashioned ways of thinking. They didn't condone me wearing a girl's uniform but didn't condone me backing out of my obligation either.
With that, my year of hell as a "girl" cheerleader began. The next day in school, I got my uniform. Right off the bat, as we left the gymnasium with our uniforms in bags tucked under our arms, the girls on the squad were shocked when they saw me with mine. They all thought it was cool and commended me for being brave but I remember them all crowding around me telling me wearing their version of the uniform would be fun and I would look so cute in it. It was awkward and I was embarrassed.
I didn't even pull it out of the bag until later that night when Stacie came over and told me to show her my uniform. I was real nervous but Stacie said she was proud of me for making the squad and begged me to try it on. Knowing I would be required to cheer in front of hundreds of people anyway wearing it, I figured I'd let the humiliation start early. I remember being in my parent's bathroom putting on the uniform with my hands trembling and nervous the whole time. After a moment, I stepped out of the bathroom with it on and saw the expression on Stacie's face for the first time. She gasped and said I looked adorable, but I felt so weird and exposed like I was on display or something. I'll never forget the little purple pleated mini skirt hanging from my waist exposing my legs well above the knees. To this point, being a boy, I had only worn shorts that went to my knees. My short skirt gave quite a view of even my thighs and I was very embarrassed! My top was a sleeveless top with black, purple, and white colors, purple panther paws, and purple lettering reading PANTHERS. She laughed at my hairy legs and said I needed to do something about that.
The following Friday was our first pep rally and the whole school would see me in my uniform for the first time. My Mom got me up early that morning and helped me shave my legs. She even put my hair in a ponytail. I was a boy, but had long hair, by the way. She then put a hair ribbon on me and a little makeup as well. She said when I don't wear my uniform to school, I can be a boy, but I didn't want to embarrass the squad either, so on days I went to school in my uniform, she told me I had to go as a girl to blend in with the other girls on the squad and not look misplaced. She even gave me a bra with mild padding to make it look like I had breasts under my uniform top.
Anyway, I felt weird walking around school in my uniform. By the way, on pep rally days, cheerleaders wore their uniforms the whole school day. I didn't even make it past first period and the boys in my class were all making fun of me! The girls were nice which I was thankful for but the boys were cruel. The bullying was the worse part. While in the hallway, boys were making whistling noises at me and several of them would grab the ends of my skirt and try to pull my skirt up in front of everyone so I had to bat their hands away and keep my hands on my skirt so they couldn't lift it. Several boys humiliated me and said "nice legs!" I'll never forget that. I endured endless amounts of "FAG!" and "*****!" taunts. Sorry to those of you who are gay and reading this. I don't use words like that. I'm just telling you what they said. I was shoved into lockers and boys were constantly calling me "girlie" and "babe" and "cutie pie!" Anyway, fortunately for me, the bullying quit after a few weeks.
This story is getting long, I realize, and I'm sorry about that, so I am going to wrap it up. I spent the rest of the year cheering with the girls as a girl. I can't imagine what the public thought of me at games and stuff and what judges and the audience at cheerleading competitions thought either. I already knew what the school thought. The only good that came from this whole event was the friends I made with the girls on the squad and the enjoyment of the actual cheering itself. When the year was over, however, I did NOT try out for cheerleading the following year even though that disappointed some of the girls on the squad and my coach too. They let me keep my uniform but I was never more grateful when my mom donated it a few years later to a clothing donation. I never saw that little purple mini skirt again. Good riddance! Anyway, that's my story. Thanks for taking time to read it. If you choose to believe it or don't, that's up to you, but it is a TRUE story. I figured being a "social phobia" website and me being quite a bit older now, I'd get this off my chest. But I'll never forget it. It will always be a part of me. Thank you and good night.
I think I found your school but not positive, it's in Sioux City, Iowa wasn't?
Or around there somewhere b/c the West High School in Sioux City, IA has the mascot of bears not panthers. But I think I'm getting close aren't I?, being all honest here, when I was in the 8th grade, one of my teachers were the JV cheer leading coach and one day that room was unlocked and empty and saw the uniforms wanted to steal one of them but then I realized they might actually call the cops I was going through an identity crisis at the time, but luckily I overcame it.
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Originally Posted by benjameson2017 View Post
When I was 14, and a freshman in high school, it was the mid-1990s. I also went to a small rural midwesten school. Having said that, this was before all those popular cheerleading movies such as Bring It On. Anyway, it was 1997 and I was 14. I'm in my mid 30s now. Before I tell this story, I will say that there WERE male cheerleaders back then. The concept of male cheerleaders were just simply less common at the time.
Anyway, one day in my early Freshman year, a friend of mine named Stacie tried encouraging me to join the cheerleading squad at our school. Of course being a boy, I was reluctant. I was however super-coordinated and Stacie knew it. She was the only person that saw me do different types of flips and cartwheels. Don't get me wrong, I wasn't very athletic. I was the shy nerdy type. I was surprised I had any friends at all, especially one like Stacie. I also was NOT gay, which makes what happens in my story so unique to my situation. I was open-minded however and had nothing against gay people. In fact, even though we were best friends because our moms were part of the same women's club, I even had a small crush on Stacie. I think she knew it too but she had a boyfriend at the time. Anyway, Stacie tried convincing me that joining cheerleading would not make me gay, and people were ignorant for thinking that.
I was still very nervous but after much coaxing on her behalf and the fact that I was sort of naive, she convinced me. It still seemed weird to me since the whole squad was girls and I was a boy but I went to tryouts. Stacie cheered in junior high, but after tryouts were over, she didn't get in...for junior varsity high school cheerleading. What was very bizarre is that I did! My cheerleading coach said she'd never seen a boy with my type of coordination and chose me and 12 other girls to be cheerleaders. Once again, I was nervous. I didn't know any of them. Stacie was the only friend I had and she didn't get picked so I felt alone.
Here's where the story went downhill for me. A few days after I made the squad, my cheerleading coach pulled me into her office and the principal was there. They both told me, and for all of you reading this post, I am NOT lying...totally serious...that I would be required to wear a girl's cheerleading uniform! Their argument was: I was the only boy and the squad was meant for girls. Before you all say I am a liar, I am fully aware of discrimination laws against this sort of thing, but realize, I was 14. I didn't know about it back then. Not only that, but I doubt those kind of laws were as greatly enforced before male cheerleading became a bigger thing...post "Bring It On" years.
Anyway, I even said to my cheerleading coach, "why did you pick me then if you knew I was a boy?" She said that she thought I was aware of the risk and knew I'd have to dress like a girl. Remember, I didn't know them forcing me was against the law. Certainly I would have sued the school had I known! I also think that they told me that as a way to "scare" me out of cheerleading. I think she and the principal suspected that since I was a guy, I had an ulterior motive...to join cheerleading to be a pervert and look up the girls' skirts. That wasn't the case at all. I wasn't gay but I would never treat a girl that way.
Anyway, after they told me I had to wear a girl's outfit, that was certainly enough of an incentive to get me to quit, so I went home and told my parents about it. Here's where it gets worse! It turns out, my cheerleading coach already called my parents and told them I made the squad and what the requirements were. Even though my Dad said he didn't like the idea of his teenage son parading around in a girl's cheerleading "mini" skirt, he didn't raise me to be a quitter either. I remember in fact those EXACT words coming from his mouth. The word "mini" skirt therefore began to haunt me and occupy my mind after he said that. When I first told my parents, I thought they'd have my side, but instead their argument was: I wrecked the opportunity for some unfortunate girl. If I tried out, the coach thought I was good enough, and some other girl didn't get the chance. They then said that it is unfair for the coach and the other cheerleaders if I quit now. Once I knew they weren't on my side, I was very bitter. My whole world collapsed. I begged them to reconsider but they said no. They said someday I'd thank them for teaching me to be honorable to my word. By the way...to this day, I don't thank them. I just thought I'd throw that in there since I'm in my mid 30s and am now the age they said I would be when I would thank them. It is now "someday" and I don't thank them. Truth be told, they were pretty religious old-fashioned people that had old-fashioned ways of thinking. They didn't condone me wearing a girl's uniform but didn't condone me backing out of my obligation either.
With that, my year of hell as a "girl" cheerleader began. The next day in school, I got my uniform. Right off the bat, as we left the gymnasium with our uniforms in bags tucked under our arms, the girls on the squad were shocked when they saw me with mine. They all thought it was cool and commended me for being brave but I remember them all crowding around me telling me wearing their version of the uniform would be fun and I would look so cute in it. It was awkward and I was embarrassed.
I didn't even pull it out of the bag until later that night when Stacie came over and told me to show her my uniform. I was real nervous but Stacie said she was proud of me for making the squad and begged me to try it on. Knowing I would be required to cheer in front of hundreds of people anyway wearing it, I figured I'd let the humiliation start early. I remember being in my parent's bathroom putting on the uniform with my hands trembling and nervous the whole time. After a moment, I stepped out of the bathroom with it on and saw the expression on Stacie's face for the first time. She gasped and said I looked adorable, but I felt so weird and exposed like I was on display or something. I'll never forget the little purple pleated mini skirt hanging from my waist exposing my legs well above the knees. To this point, being a boy, I had only worn shorts that went to my knees. My short skirt gave quite a view of even my thighs and I was very embarrassed! My top was a sleeveless top with black, purple, and white colors, purple panther paws, and purple lettering reading PANTHERS. She laughed at my hairy legs and said I needed to do something about that.
The following Friday was our first pep rally and the whole school would see me in my uniform for the first time. My Mom got me up early that morning and helped me shave my legs. She even put my hair in a ponytail. I was a boy, but had long hair, by the way. She then put a hair ribbon on me and a little makeup as well. She said when I don't wear my uniform to school, I can be a boy, but I didn't want to embarrass the squad either, so on days I went to school in my uniform, she told me I had to go as a girl to blend in with the other girls on the squad and not look misplaced. She even gave me a bra with mild padding to make it look like I had breasts under my uniform top.
Anyway, I felt weird walking around school in my uniform. By the way, on pep rally days, cheerleaders wore their uniforms the whole school day. I didn't even make it past first period and the boys in my class were all making fun of me! The girls were nice which I was thankful for but the boys were cruel. The bullying was the worse part. While in the hallway, boys were making whistling noises at me and several of them would grab the ends of my skirt and try to pull my skirt up in front of everyone so I had to bat their hands away and keep my hands on my skirt so they couldn't lift it. Several boys humiliated me and said "nice legs!" I'll never forget that. I endured endless amounts of "FAG!" and "*****!" taunts. Sorry to those of you who are gay and reading this. I don't use words like that. I'm just telling you what they said. I was shoved into lockers and boys were constantly calling me "girlie" and "babe" and "cutie pie!" Anyway, fortunately for me, the bullying quit after a few weeks.
This story is getting long, I realize, and I'm sorry about that, so I am going to wrap it up. I spent the rest of the year cheering with the girls as a girl. I can't imagine what the public thought of me at games and stuff and what judges and the audience at cheerleading competitions thought either. I already knew what the school thought. The only good that came from this whole event was the friends I made with the girls on the squad and the enjoyment of the actual cheering itself. When the year was over, however, I did NOT try out for cheerleading the following year even though that disappointed some of the girls on the squad and my coach too. They let me keep my uniform but I was never more grateful when my mom donated it a few years later to a clothing donation. I never saw that little purple mini skirt again. Good riddance! Anyway, that's my story. Thanks for taking time to read it. If you choose to believe it or don't, that's up to you, but it is a TRUE story. I figured being a "social phobia" website and me being quite a bit older now, I'd get this off my chest. But I'll never forget it. It will always be a part of me. Thank you and good night.

Is your old school closed .or opened?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benjameson2017 View Post
When I was 14, and a freshman in high school, it was the mid-1990s. I also went to a small rural midwesten school. Having said that, this was before all those popular cheerleading movies such as Bring It On. Anyway, it was 1997 and I was 14. I'm in my mid 30s now. Before I tell this story, I will say that there WERE male cheerleaders back then. The concept of male cheerleaders were just simply less common at the time.
Anyway, one day in my early Freshman year, a friend of mine named Stacie tried encouraging me to join the cheerleading squad at our school. Of course being a boy, I was reluctant. I was however super-coordinated and Stacie knew it. She was the only person that saw me do different types of flips and cartwheels. Don't get me wrong, I wasn't very athletic. I was the shy nerdy type. I was surprised I had any friends at all, especially one like Stacie. I also was NOT gay, which makes what happens in my story so unique to my situation. I was open-minded however and had nothing against gay people. In fact, even though we were best friends because our moms were part of the same women's club, I even had a small crush on Stacie. I think she knew it too but she had a boyfriend at the time. Anyway, Stacie tried convincing me that joining cheerleading would not make me gay, and people were ignorant for thinking that.
I was still very nervous but after much coaxing on her behalf and the fact that I was sort of naive, she convinced me. It still seemed weird to me since the whole squad was girls and I was a boy but I went to tryouts. Stacie cheered in junior high, but after tryouts were over, she didn't get in...for junior varsity high school cheerleading. What was very bizarre is that I did! My cheerleading coach said she'd never seen a boy with my type of coordination and chose me and 12 other girls to be cheerleaders. Once again, I was nervous. I didn't know any of them. Stacie was the only friend I had and she didn't get picked so I felt alone.
Here's where the story went downhill for me. A few days after I made the squad, my cheerleading coach pulled me into her office and the principal was there. They both told me, and for all of you reading this post, I am NOT lying...totally serious...that I would be required to wear a girl's cheerleading uniform! Their argument was: I was the only boy and the squad was meant for girls. Before you all say I am a liar, I am fully aware of discrimination laws against this sort of thing, but realize, I was 14. I didn't know about it back then. Not only that, but I doubt those kind of laws were as greatly enforced before male cheerleading became a bigger thing...post "Bring It On" years.
Anyway, I even said to my cheerleading coach, "why did you pick me then if you knew I was a boy?" She said that she thought I was aware of the risk and knew I'd have to dress like a girl. Remember, I didn't know them forcing me was against the law. Certainly I would have sued the school had I known! I also think that they told me that as a way to "scare" me out of cheerleading. I think she and the principal suspected that since I was a guy, I had an ulterior motive...to join cheerleading to be a pervert and look up the girls' skirts. That wasn't the case at all. I wasn't gay but I would never treat a girl that way.
Anyway, after they told me I had to wear a girl's outfit, that was certainly enough of an incentive to get me to quit, so I went home and told my parents about it. Here's where it gets worse! It turns out, my cheerleading coach already called my parents and told them I made the squad and what the requirements were. Even though my Dad said he didn't like the idea of his teenage son parading around in a girl's cheerleading "mini" skirt, he didn't raise me to be a quitter either. I remember in fact those EXACT words coming from his mouth. The word "mini" skirt therefore began to haunt me and occupy my mind after he said that. When I first told my parents, I thought they'd have my side, but instead their argument was: I wrecked the opportunity for some unfortunate girl. If I tried out, the coach thought I was good enough, and some other girl didn't get the chance. They then said that it is unfair for the coach and the other cheerleaders if I quit now. Once I knew they weren't on my side, I was very bitter. My whole world collapsed. I begged them to reconsider but they said no. They said someday I'd thank them for teaching me to be honorable to my word. By the way...to this day, I don't thank them. I just thought I'd throw that in there since I'm in my mid 30s and am now the age they said I would be when I would thank them. It is now "someday" and I don't thank them. Truth be told, they were pretty religious old-fashioned people that had old-fashioned ways of thinking. They didn't condone me wearing a girl's uniform but didn't condone me backing out of my obligation either.
With that, my year of hell as a "girl" cheerleader began. The next day in school, I got my uniform. Right off the bat, as we left the gymnasium with our uniforms in bags tucked under our arms, the girls on the squad were shocked when they saw me with mine. They all thought it was cool and commended me for being brave but I remember them all crowding around me telling me wearing their version of the uniform would be fun and I would look so cute in it. It was awkward and I was embarrassed.
I didn't even pull it out of the bag until later that night when Stacie came over and told me to show her my uniform. I was real nervous but Stacie said she was proud of me for making the squad and begged me to try it on. Knowing I would be required to cheer in front of hundreds of people anyway wearing it, I figured I'd let the humiliation start early. I remember being in my parent's bathroom putting on the uniform with my hands trembling and nervous the whole time. After a moment, I stepped out of the bathroom with it on and saw the expression on Stacie's face for the first time. She gasped and said I looked adorable, but I felt so weird and exposed like I was on display or something. I'll never forget the little purple pleated mini skirt hanging from my waist exposing my legs well above the knees. To this point, being a boy, I had only worn shorts that went to my knees. My short skirt gave quite a view of even my thighs and I was very embarrassed! My top was a sleeveless top with black, purple, and white colors, purple panther paws, and purple lettering reading PANTHERS. She laughed at my hairy legs and said I needed to do something about that.
The following Friday was our first pep rally and the whole school would see me in my uniform for the first time. My Mom got me up early that morning and helped me shave my legs. She even put my hair in a ponytail. I was a boy, but had long hair, by the way. She then put a hair ribbon on me and a little makeup as well. She said when I don't wear my uniform to school, I can be a boy, but I didn't want to embarrass the squad either, so on days I went to school in my uniform, she told me I had to go as a girl to blend in with the other girls on the squad and not look misplaced. She even gave me a bra with mild padding to make it look like I had breasts under my uniform top.
Anyway, I felt weird walking around school in my uniform. By the way, on pep rally days, cheerleaders wore their uniforms the whole school day. I didn't even make it past first period and the boys in my class were all making fun of me! The girls were nice which I was thankful for but the boys were cruel. The bullying was the worse part. While in the hallway, boys were making whistling noises at me and several of them would grab the ends of my skirt and try to pull my skirt up in front of everyone so I had to bat their hands away and keep my hands on my skirt so they couldn't lift it. Several boys humiliated me and said "nice legs!" I'll never forget that. I endured endless amounts of "FAG!" and "*****!" taunts. Sorry to those of you who are gay and reading this. I don't use words like that. I'm just telling you what they said. I was shoved into lockers and boys were constantly calling me "girlie" and "babe" and "cutie pie!" Anyway, fortunately for me, the bullying quit after a few weeks.
This story is getting long, I realize, and I'm sorry about that, so I am going to wrap it up. I spent the rest of the year cheering with the girls as a girl. I can't imagine what the public thought of me at games and stuff and what judges and the audience at cheerleading competitions thought either. I already knew what the school thought. The only good that came from this whole event was the friends I made with the girls on the squad and the enjoyment of the actual cheering itself. When the year was over, however, I did NOT try out for cheerleading the following year even though that disappointed some of the girls on the squad and my coach too. They let me keep my uniform but I was never more grateful when my mom donated it a few years later to a clothing donation. I never saw that little purple mini skirt again. Good riddance! Anyway, that's my story. Thanks for taking time to read it. If you choose to believe it or don't, that's up to you, but it is a TRUE story. I figured being a "social phobia" website and me being quite a bit older now, I'd get this off my chest. But I'll never forget it. It will always be a part of me. Thank you and good night.

If you want people to believe it, why don't you put your schools name here? Huh?
B/c I went to Oglethorpe County High School, 749 Athens Road, Lexington, Georgia 30648 USA see, I posted my high school address so why don't you post yours?
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