SocialPhobiaWorld.com  
     

Home Today's Posts Register Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
 
Go Back   SocialPhobiaWorld.com > Off-Topic Forums > Off-Topic
 
Search this Thread
Old 07-04-2017
Hot_Tamale's Avatar
Advanced User
 

I have not seen a topic relating solely to food underneath the off-topic section on the forums so I figured I would create my own. Not eating out in restaurants as much and becoming more independent in my eating habits is a way for me to shrink my anxiety even more so over time.

This thread is for people that would like to share recipes, talk about their favorite foods, share their favorite pictures of food, or share more information about foods native to their own countries.

Copy a user's recipe, share one of your own for someone else to try, or use the thread as your personal dumping ground for recipes to come back to. Speaking for myself, I know I feel like a million bucks after I bake something or make a dish for dinner all from scratch. My anxiety over whatever days events or what other people currently think about me take a back seat and I'm able to focus on the recipe in front of me. Baking my own cookies, pies, and cakes seem to have a greater therapeutic effect on my emotions more so than dishes I make for breakfast or dinner, however...it must be all of the sugar.

If people will use this thread as a logbook for their own recipes to come back to or share with others than more power to them. Just have fun!!



I will kick off the thread with a dish of my own. I literally made this one the same day I created this forum thread and it is a very popular one in my city (San Antonio). You can find green beans in almost every non-fast food restaurant in the city and each with their own unique spin on the side dish. Non-Hispanic restaurants less than others. Multiple recipes involving green beans are always found in all you can eat buffet restaurants, sometimes paired with potatoes or onions but almost always smothered in garlic, vegetable oil, and sometimes salt which is exactly where my inspiration for this recipe came from:

Green Beans w/ Garlic Lemon Pepper Sauce

- 1 pound bag of green beans
- 4 tablespoons butter
- 1/2 to 1 tablespoon lemon pepper
- 1 teaspoon and up of chopped garlic or powder (or garlic salt)

1. Empty a one pound (1 lb.) bag of frozen green beans in a pot of boiling water. If the ends of the beans are not sliced off already then put them to the side and slice off the ends. This is purely optional though.

2. Set a timer for 10 minutes and let the beans soak in the boiling water on high heat. The lower the heat you're using the more time you need to let them soak. Putting a lid on top of the pot is optional but will allow the trapped steam to soften the beans even more so I assume. I cooked them with the lid on top.

3. While you are letting the beans soak in the water grab a plate and cut up 4 tablespoons of butter. Take out a bottle of lemon pepper and chopped garlic too.

4. After the 10 minutes are over, take the pot of green beans and drain as much water as you can from it.

5. With the stove turned off (or on, there should still be enough heat on the stove to keep it turned off and still have the butter melt) add the butter to the green beans and mix well.

6. Add lemon pepper to taste. I don't have an exact measurement to use, I can only say adjust the amount you use to your own taste. I used approximately 3 quarters of a tablespoon to 1 tablespoon.

7. 1 teaspoon of chopped garlic you can buy at the store. Garlic powder or garlic salt works too. Adjust the amount you use to how much you can taste it, you might have to add more.

8. Shake regular table salt on top if it appeals to you. Personally I feel like it tasted better with salt sprinkled on top.

Hot_Tamale is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Hot_Tamale For This Useful Post:
Jungle (07-06-2017)
Old 07-06-2017
Jungle's Avatar
Spamming his way to Elite user
Advanced User
 

Hey Hot_Tamale, great initiative there, I am not so much of a gourmet (just to tell you that my favourite dish is rice with onions and chicken, with only olive oil as a seasoning), but I sure can contribute.

Algeria is famous for its excellent dates (Deglet noor), I was surprised to see them quoted in the last Hitman game https://youtu.be/012NWp4nGKY?t=17m40s

Cooscoos (granulated semolina), Harissa (red chili paste) , and of course sweets and bakeries (full of fats unfortunately).

Yours looks delicious, texmex food is full of beans!
Jungle is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Jungle For This Useful Post:
Hot_Tamale (07-06-2017)
Old 07-06-2017
Hot_Tamale's Avatar
Advanced User
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jungle View Post
Hey Hot_Tamale, great initiative there, I am not so much of a gourmet (just to tell you that my favourite dish is rice with onions and chicken, with only olive oil as a seasoning), but I sure can contribute.

Algeria is famous for its excellent dates (Deglet noor), I was surprised to see them quoted in the last Hitman game https://youtu.be/012NWp4nGKY?t=17m40s

Cooscoos (granulated semolina), Harissa (red chili paste) , and of course sweets and bakeries (full of fats unfortunately).

Yours looks delicious, texmex food is full of beans!
Rice with onions and chicken? That sounds good. I need to try that. Algeria is an underrepresented country among food lovers and a country Americans have trouble pointing to on a map.
Hot_Tamale is offline  
Old 07-06-2017
Hot_Tamale's Avatar
Advanced User
 

New update: A good substitute for the skin on fried chicken is corn flakes or another crunchy breakfast food. Marinate skinless chicken breasts overnight in the refrigerator and the next day roll the breast in crushed corn flakes, then bake the chicken in the oven.

Update #2: I made a strawberry flavored breakfast shake today made with flax seed, crushed ice, Greek yogurt, coconut milk, honey, and strawberries. It was a filling shake and can make a good substitute for a meal in the future. The only downside was that it shot through me like a bullet! I made the shake and 10 minutes later I was walking to the toilet.
Hot_Tamale is offline  
Old 07-06-2017
AtTheGates's Avatar
Expert User
 

Just put it in the oven



AtTheGates is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to AtTheGates For This Useful Post:
BlueDays (07-08-2017), Hot_Tamale (07-06-2017)
Old 07-06-2017
Hot_Tamale's Avatar
Advanced User
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AtTheGates View Post
Just put it in the oven



lol I legit thought that pizza box image was an advertisement at the end of the page. Are the folk stories true about homemade wine being made from prison toilets?
Hot_Tamale is offline  
Old 07-06-2017
AtTheGates's Avatar
Expert User
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hot_Tamale View Post
lol I legit thought that pizza box image was an advertisement at the end of the page. Are the folk stories true about homemade wine being made from prison toilets?

actually yes. I haven't seen it made in a toilet but a few inmates have tried to make wine in trash bags using water, orange peels, apple cores, etc. it doesnt happen very often because they know we'll find it before it "ferments" lol . they have hardly anywhere to hide it anyway and we do searches daily.

as soon as I see an inmate filling a trash bag with water I'm like "seriously?"
AtTheGates is offline  
Old 07-08-2017
grapevine's Avatar
Expert User
 

I used to make this all the time - its absolutely yummy..

The ingredients seem $$ to most people I have told it about- but personally its soo worth it. (The way that I eat I am able to afford this too as I dont eat mainstream and buy in bulk)

grapevine is offline  
Old 07-08-2017
 

Pork Sinigang, also called Sinigang na Baboy, is a traditional Filipino soup dish known for its sour flavor. By tradition, the souring ingredient of this dish comes from a tamarind fruit. Through time, this souring ingredient diversed and instead of using tamarind, guava, calamansi, bilimbi (kamias), unripe green mango, or santol can also be used. Today, a popular powdered sour-soup based ingredient called the "Sinigang Mix" is commonly used. This Sinigang Mix powder is as popular as it is commonly available in most Filipino stores and supermarkets. It comes, popularly, in tamarind and guava flavor.

Sinigang is an indigenous Filipino dish believed to have been influenced by Philippine's neighboring countries. In fact, Sinigang resembles that of the sour soup based cuisine of other Southeast Asian countries like Malaysia's "Singgang", Indonesia's "Sayur Asam", Thailand's "Tom Yum", and "Canh Chua" of Vietnam.

Pork Sinigang also resembles other Filipino soup sour dish called Sinampalokan or Sinampalokan na Manok. The difference of the two dishes, aside from their ingredients, are the ways they are cooked. While Sinampalokan uses the cooking method of "sautéing" and "boiling", the authentic and traditional method of cooking Pork Sinigang is "boiling". In Sinampalokan, the meat (traditionally chicken) is first sautéed in ginger before boiling and in Sinigang, the meat is simply boiled with the other ingredients. Sinampalokan solely uses tamarind souring based ingredient like tamarind fruit and leaves, while Sinigang has options to use various kinds of souring ingredients such as guava, santol, or mango.

The common vegetable ingredients of Pork Sinigang are tomato, onion, garlic, water spinach, radish, taro, eggplant (talong), daikon (labanos), long chilli pepper and string beans. Other variations include using fish (tilapia, milkfish, or salmon), shrimp, beef, or goat as substitute for pork and bok choy, cabbage, brocolli, potato, carrot as alternative vegetable ingredients. Another variation of Pork Sinigang is the "Sinigang na Miso" which include the use of Japanese seasoning composed of fermented rice and barley or soy beans.

One of the secrets of cooking a delicious Sinigang na Baboy is to inlcude the bones of the pig (e.g. pork belly with rib bones, pork neck with bones, baby back ribs, and other bony parts) because bones add more flavor to the broth. The cooking method is to first boil the pork to tenderize. Add the souring ingredient, giving time for the meat to absorb the sour flavor of the broth. Add the vegetables and those that are longer to cook should be the first to be added.

Pork Sinigang Ingredients
2 lbs pork liempo; cut 2 inches chunks
1 package tamarind sinigang soup mix
1 tomato; quartered
1 onion; quartered
1 taro; quartered
3-4 long green chili peppers (siling haba)
1 medium size radish (labanos); sliced
3 string beans (sitaw), cut in 2 inches long
1 eggplant; sliced
10 stems of kangkong leaves
Fish sauce to taste
Water
Pork Sinigang Cooking Instructions
Boil water in a pot.
Add the pork liempo, tomato, onion, and tamarind sinigang soup mix.
Cover the pot and boil until the meat is tender.
Add the long chili pepper, radish, taro, string beans, and eggplant.
Cover the pot and continue boiling until the vegetables are cooked.
Add the kangkong leaves and simmer until the dish is done.
Serve while hot!
Battlebreath is offline  
Old 07-16-2017
Hot_Tamale's Avatar
Advanced User
 

I tried making baked chicken with the corn flakes crust on the outside of the chicken recently. I thought it would taste amazing, I was sadly mistaken. I let the chicken marinate in a bowl of sour cream and then rolled it in the crushed corn flakes. The problem was that the sour cream was in clumps around parts of the chicken and the corn flakes wouldn't stick to every part of the chicken. Because some parts were more coated with sour cream than others it caused the chicken to not bake evenly. I didn't burn the chicken but I did somehow burn parts of the sour cream on the outside (the sour cream not covered by the corn flakes). Next time I'm replacing ranch dressing for the sour cream and if that still doesn't work then I'm going to throw this recipe in the trash.
Hot_Tamale is offline  
Old 07-22-2017
Jungle's Avatar
Spamming his way to Elite user
Advanced User
 

Jungle is offline  
Old 07-23-2017
Remus's Avatar
Super Moderator
Elite User
 

Lancashire hotpot:


lamb chops or lamb neck 500g
3 tbsp oil
1 large carrot, roughly chopped
1 large onion, roughly chopped
2 tbsp plain flour
1 litre beef stock
8 sprigs fresh thyme or 1 tsp dried.
1 bay leaf
100g/3½oz butter, melted
2 large floury potatoes, such as Maris Piper, sliced into 1cm/½in-thick discs
salt and freshly ground black pepper



Preheat the oven to 170C/150C fan/Gas 3.

Season the lamb chops/neck with plenty of salt and freshly ground black pepper. Heat the oil in a frying pan over a medium heat, then fry the lamb for 2-3 minutes on each side, or until browned all over. Transfer the lamb chops to a medium casserole.

Fry the carrot and onion in the same frying pan for 4-5 minutes, or until coloured and softened.

Stir the flour into the vegetables and continue to fry for 2-3 minutes, or until the flour turns a biscuit colour.

Pour in the beef stock and stir well until the liquid has thickened and there are no visible lumps of flour.

Transfer the vegetables and thickened stock to the casserole. Add thyme and the bay leaf, then bring the mixture to the boil. Reduce the heat until the mixture is just simmering.

Melt the butter in a small saucepan over a medium heat.

Arrange the potato slices on top of the hotpot, overlapping the edges slightly. Brush the potato slices all over with the melted butter. Sprinkle the top with a few thyme leaves from the remaining sprig of thyme.

Bake the hotpot in the oven for 1-1½ hours, or until the potato topping is crisp and golden-brown and the vegetables are tender.
Remus is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Remus For This Useful Post:
BlueDays (07-26-2017)
Old 07-24-2017
nodejesque's Avatar
Expert User
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AtTheGates View Post
Just put it in the oven



I love this brand of pizza. (●__●)

Nothing like cheap frozen pizza and cold beer on a Monday morning to get you ready to face the week.
nodejesque is offline  
Post Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads to Your personal/countries recipes and food
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
food heaven,food hell Ransfordrowe Off-Topic 7 03-29-2014 12:12 AM
DO THIRD WORD COUNTRIES HAVE S.A. OR DEPRESSION ? kevd Depression Forum 13 01-21-2013 02:47 AM
SPW Cookbook! Post Your Recipes & Pics Deus_Ex_Lemur Texts, Poems, Dreams, Phrases... 12 06-21-2011 10:47 PM
want to knoe new bands from other countries gascar Off-Topic 2 08-30-2008 05:30 AM
Alcohol and non-UK countries steviegerrard489 Social Anxiety Forum 7 12-06-2007 02:14 AM



Mobile Version
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.2
All times are GMT. The time now is 12:10 PM.