Quora thread on a giant list of social faux pas'

LoyalXenite

Well-known member
#2
idk if its just me but that list seems rather douchey.. like Requiring everyone to cater to your special food preferences - what if the person has a genuine allergy or something? surely common courtesy is to have a allergy free option for those guests.. Telling people how awful the weather is? sometimes the weather is crappy and people like to vent together about it...

Some of the things on the list are obvious and just common sense, but some are just nit picking.. like I'd rather my mates be themselves around me and not some stiff fake version

(I should add I havent slept in 24 hours and so am a little grumpy and probably not receptive to lists telling me what I can and cant do :giggle: )
 
#3
hmm, some of those on that list are pretty weird.

* "Not fixing body issues that distract people from your message"

What the heck does that mean?

* "Inviting the less fortunate to an expensive restaurant and not paying"

Who would DO that anyway!? :eek:h:

That list should have about 1/2 of it taken out, because as LoyalXenite said, a great deal of them are just simply common sense.

The trouble with really long lists of anything - that include a lot of pointless/obvious things in it - is that it puts people off reading the whole thing.
Then they might miss some really good points, if there are some, further down the list.
 
#5
Yes there is a lot of irrelevent things on this list. Some are true, some are just common sense, some are douchey as Puma said, and some are kind of stupid.

I think the secret to good social skills is to adapt to whom you're talking to.

But it's probably safe to say this: As a regular user of a social anxiety forum, I have no idea what I'm talking about.
 
#7
Yes there is a lot of irrelevent things on this list. Some are true, some are just common sense, some are douchey as Puma said, and some are kind of stupid.

I think the secret to good social skills is to adapt to whom you're talking to.

But it's probably safe to say this: As a regular user of a social anxiety forum, I have no idea what I'm talking about.
I think we are all on the same page, with you Pacific_Loner.

I believe being well accustomed to good or bad social interactions, can also depend on what a person has been shown or taught by their parents.
Our parents can have a large influence our social behaviour skills, just as much as a great or little amount of actual experience in social interactions imo.

Do any of you agree or not - that family upbringing has a significant affect on our knowledge of how we think we should behave around people?
Although I suppose that would depend on the degree to which each individual takes on what their parents have taught them, or rejects it. :thinking:

I don't know what I am talking about either, lol. Don't mind me, just texting as I think..... :bigsmile:
 

Miserum

Well-known member
#8
I think we are all on the same page, with you Pacific_Loner.

I believe being well accustomed to good or bad social interactions, can also depend on what a person has been shown or taught by their parents.
Our parents can have a large influence our social behaviour skills, just as much as a great or little amount of actual experience in social interactions imo.

Do any of you agree or not - that family upbringing has a significant affect on our knowledge of how we think we should behave around people?
Although I suppose that would depend on the degree to which each individual takes on what their parents have taught them, or rejects it. :thinking:

I don't know what I am talking about either, lol. Don't mind me, just texting as I think..... :bigsmile:
I agree that family upbringing has a huge effect on who we become. I had a shit upbringing, so here I am. And even though I would like to reject some of my upbringing, I think a portion of that is subconscious and profoundly difficult to overcome. There are other factors. I won't pretend that other people and events outside the family don't have an effect, or even genetics, but yes, family upbringing is huge.
 
#9
I think we are all on the same page, with you Pacific_Loner.

I believe being well accustomed to good or bad social interactions, can also depend on what a person has been shown or taught by their parents.
Our parents can have a large influence our social behaviour skills, just as much as a great or little amount of actual experience in social interactions imo.

Do any of you agree or not - that family upbringing has a significant affect on our knowledge of how we think we should behave around people?
Although I suppose that would depend on the degree to which each individual takes on what their parents have taught them, or rejects it. :thinking:

I don't know what I am talking about either, lol. Don't mind me, just texting as I think..... :bigsmile:
Yeah that sounds like something that would make sense. My parents were never very good socially, I never witnessed what we would call "normal" social behaviour around them. There was a lot of things that normal kids learn by watching their parents behave, that I only learned later as a young adult by watching other people or other people's parents behave. I still learn things sometimes that apparently everyone knows that you're supposed to do, or say, but I don't, which can be a little bit humiliating unless you learn to laugh about it
 

lily

Well-known member
#10
Yeah the way your family behaves can really impact you such as shyness. if my parents weren't more on the shy side, i'd probably be more out-going but I'm learning.

Thoughts on this?

My biggest issue lately has been a lack of smiling I think, mostly because life is in the gutter. And if I do smile, people tend to think I'm weak and treat me accordingly (or maybe that's in my head).

https://www.quora.com/What-are-examples-of-bad-people-social-skills
you shouldn't care about if you smile then people would probably think you're weak although i know it can be hard but it's a great asset to smile, you let other people feel that you're friendly.
 
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Miserum

Well-known member
#11
you shouldn't care about if you smile then people would probably think you're weak although i know it can be hard but it's a great asset to smile, you let other people feel that you're friendly.
Good point, lily. Though, I find it so hard to smile at other people these days. It feels like I'm forcing it because I really don't feel that good about myself.

Also if I smile, that usually invites conversation, something I'm not so fond of these days either, again because of my self-image.
 

lily

Well-known member
#12
Good point, lily. Though, I find it so hard to smile at other people these days. It feels like I'm forcing it because I really don't feel that good about myself.

Also if I smile, that usually invites conversation, something I'm not so fond of these days either, again because of my self-image.
i see, i understand now, yes it does invite conversation
 
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