Humor

Miserum

Well-known member
#1
Humor is something I've thought a lot about during my life. What makes some things funny and some things not is a mystery to me. I think compatible humor is vital to making and maintaining a good relationship.

There is something I've just recently noticed about how many people implement their own humor into social interactions.

They basically just laugh at their own jokes, and most of the time, other people will laugh along with them--or at least smile.

Example:

Person A: <insert joke>.... big smile hahaha
Person B: hahaha

Of course there is also deadpan humor, which has more or less been a large part of my humor style for quite a while. Sometimes people don't get my deadpan humor because my delivery usually comes without smiles or laughter. Sometimes they don't even realize I'm joking. And I'm no master joke teller or quipster either, so the pairing of my deadpan delivery with not-so-funny remarks probably just makes me seem weird.

I think part of this humor style is derived from my social anxiety; I'm afraid to laugh at my own jokes because--horrors--what if no one else laughs? Surely I'll look like an idiot in that case.

Maybe I should try laughing at my own jokes--thereby making the implied statement that "Hey, this is a joke!"--and seeing if that changes how people respond to my humor.
 
#2
Humor is something I've thought a lot about during my life. What makes some things funny and some things not is a mystery to me. I think compatible humor is vital to making and maintaining a good relationship.

There is something I've just recently noticed about how many people implement their own humor into social interactions.

They basically just laugh at their own jokes, and most of the time, other people will laugh along with them--or at least smile.

Example:

Person A: <insert joke>.... big smile hahaha
Person B: hahaha

Of course there is also deadpan humor, which has more or less been a large part of my humor style for quite a while. Sometimes people don't get my deadpan humor because my delivery usually comes without smiles or laughter. Sometimes they don't even realize I'm joking. And I'm no master joke teller or quipster either, so the pairing of my deadpan delivery with not-so-funny remarks probably just makes me seem weird.

I think part of this humor style is derived from my social anxiety; I'm afraid to laugh at my own jokes because--horrors--what if no one else laughs? Surely I'll look like an idiot in that case.

Maybe I should try laughing at my own jokes--thereby making the implied statement that "Hey, this is a joke!"--and seeing if that changes how people respond to my humor.
I think you should definitely try and smile/laugh at your own jokes. It seems that it is greatly underestimated, how heavily people rely on non-verbal body language, to determine in what context a persons comment has been said.

If they are in doubt that it is meant to be a joke, a smile/laugh from you, will definitely make it so much easier for them to realise that, as you mentioned. And therefore they will instantly feel comfortable enough to laugh with you.

Even if you are too weary of doing a full laugh, try just a big, noticeable smile, and let us know if it helps. :)
 
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